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Songs with Theorbo (ca. 1650–1663)

Songs with Theorbo (ca. 1650–1663)
Oxford, Bodleian Library, Broxbourne 84.9; London, Lambeth Palace Library, 1041
Edited by Gordon J. Callon
B105
Songs with Theorbo (ca. 1650–1663)
Full Score (2000)
978-0-89579-461-1
9x12, xlviii + 112 pp.

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$66.00
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The two manuscripts Oxford, Bodleian Library MS Broxbourne 84.9 and London, Lambeth Palace Library MS 1041 contain forty-four songs, mostly with theorbo or lute accompaniment; twenty-nine songs are in English, seven are in French, and eight are in Italian.  The English composers of these songs include Henry and William Lawes, Nicholas Lanier, and Charles Colman.  Three French songs can be identified as the work of François de Chancy, Michel Lambert, and Jean de Cambefort.  Seven of the English songs (by Locke Goodgroome, Marsh, Edward Colman, Henry Lawes, and an anonymous source) are in a later section of the Lambeth Palace Manuscripts (ca. 1665–1670) and are with a thorough-bass accompaniment. Many songs are embellished with written-out ornamentation.  
 
Because several songs were transcribed by Charles Colman, a professional singer and theorbo player, the manuscripts preserve evidence of period vocal performance and theorbo continuo style.  As a member of the King's Music, Colman was acquainted with the composers whose songs are in the manuscripts.  Some of the songs are unique to these manuscripts or are in unique variant versions.
Oxford, Bodleian Library, Broxbourne 84.9
1. No, no, I never was in love, [Henry Lawes]
2. Silly heart forbear, [Nicholas Lanier]
3. Amorosa pargoletta, [Nicholas Lanier]
4. Fuggi, fuggi, fuggi, diletta amante, Anonymous
5. Je ne puis éviter, [François de Chancy]
6. How cool and temp’rate am I grown, [Henry Lawes]
7. I’m sick of love, [William Lawes]
8. Oft have I sworn I’d love no more, [Henry Lawes]
9. [La Folia] (with additional exercise), Anonymous
10. Blest be those powers, Charles Colman
11. S’io morrò, che dirà, Anonymous
12. Dove, dove, corri, mio core?, Anonymous
13. How happy art thou and I (variant), Henry Lawes
14. Lord, to thee I make my moan (Psalm 130), Anonymous
15. Lord, in thy wrath reprove me not (Psalm 6), Anonymous
16. Blessed art they that perfect are (Psalm 119), Anonymous
 
London, Lambeth Palace Library, 1041
1. We do account that music good, Anonymous
2. Silly heart forbear, [Nicholas Lanier]
3. Go thy way, since thou wilt go, Anonymous
4. Sing aloud harmonious spheres, Anonymous
5. Beat on proud billows, Boreas blow (Light in a dungeon), Anonymous
6. Ask me no more whither doth stray [Ask me no more where Jove bestows], Anonymous
7. Je ne connais que trop que j’aime, [Michel Lambert]
8. N’entendez-vous point ce langage?, [Jean de Cambefort]
9. Qu’un rival vienne devant moi, Anonymous
10. Se voi, luci amate, [Gabriel de Rochechouart, Marquis de Mortemart?]
11. When shall I see my captive heart, [Henry Lawes?]
12. Chère Phillis, puisque tous mes services, Anonymous
13. Ne vous étonnez pas, Anonymous
14. Ma Cloris, je me meurs d’amour, Anonymous
15. Cloris, when I to thee present, [Henry Lawes]
16. Bright Aurelia, I do owe, Charles Colman
17. O mia Filli gradita, Anonymous
18. Never persuade me to’it I vow, Charles Colman
19. Perfect and endless circles are, [William Lawes]
20. Farewell, farewell, fond love, Charles Colman
21. Pensieri quietate, quietate non più, Anonymous
22. Non temer, Filli mia, Anonymous
23. Last night my fair resolved to go, Anonymous
24. Lucinda, wink or veil those eyes, Matthew Locke
25. Fret on fond Cupid, curse thy feeble bow, John Goodgroome
26. Ye powers that guard Love’s silken throne, Anonymous
27. Oft have I searched both court and town, Alphonso Marsh
28. The glories of our birth and state, Edward Colman
29. Cloris when that you do intend, [Henry Lawes]
 
Appendix: Variants
No, no, I never was in love, Henry Lawes
How cool and temp’rate I am grown, Henry Lawes
Oft have I swore I’d love no more, Henry Lawes
Je ne connais que trop que j’aime, [Michel Lambert]
N’entendez-vous point ce langage?,  [Jean de Cambefort]
Se voi, luci amate, [Gabriel de Rochechouart, Marquis de Mortemart?]
Cloris, when I to thee present, Henry Lawes
O mia Filli gradita, Anonymous
Cloris, when e’er you do intend, Henry Lawes
Early Music Review 65 (November 2000): 3; Ian Spink, Music & Letters, 2002; Bill Badley, Journal of the Lute Society, 2001
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