My Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Items 1 to 5 of 20 total
Results per page:
Sort

The Forerunner in the Race: Struggles of a Victorian Woman Composer

Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:00:00 AM America/Chicago

By Ian Graham-Jones

It was nearly thirty years ago that a collection of manuscripts, together with a few printed editions, of the music of Alice Mary Smith (1837–84) came into my possession following the death of the composer’s grandson. They were in a haphazard state—some had been kept in an old garage, others, more damaged, in a leaking garden shed. Besides a number of full scores, there were bundles of complete sets of orchestral parts, miscellaneous drafts and scraps of manuscript, and even harmony and species counterpoint exercises. But it was not until after my retirement that I was able to spend time assessing the worth of the collection and realizing that Smith was the first British woman composer to have any success in writing in larger-scale forms and, moreover, in having her works performed.

Read More
           
Comments | Posted in Featured Publications By A-R Editions

Looking Past the Scottishness: William McGibbon’s Sonatas

Wednesday, December 11, 2019 9:00:00 AM America/Chicago

By Elizabeth C. Ford

William McGibbon (1695–1756) was once described to me as the best-known Scottish composer no one had ever heard of; I believe that’s a reasonably accurate assessment. When I first encountered his name in David Johnson’s monograph Music and Society in Lowland Scotland in the Eighteenth Century, I was left with the impression that his music had faded into well-deserved obscurity. At the same time, I noted that Henry George Farmer in A History of Music in Scotland (1947) spoke highly of McGibbon’s flute duets (published around 1748), though most musicians I spoke to only knew of McGibbon’s collections of Scottish tunes and the one trio sonata of his that has been published a few times in “greatest hits” collections (no. 5 from his set of 1734, headed “In Imitation of Corelli”). I knew that this wasn’t quite good enough for my studies on the flute in eighteenth-century Scotland, so I wanted to see what the rest of his music was like, and if he deserved the reputation he had. This edition is the result.

Read More
           
1 Comments | Posted in Featured Publications By A-R Editions

Music, Spectacle, and Politics at the Court of Catherine the Great

Wednesday, October 9, 2019 3:00:00 PM America/Chicago

By Bella Brover-Lubovsky

Catherine the Great (1729–96), Empress of All the Russias, was neither a devoted music lover nor a musical connoisseur. However, she assigned exceptional importance to dramatic performances that extolled her reign and policies, with a particular passion for spectacles based on her own literary production. Among these, Catherine especially favored the grandiose pageant Nachal’noe upravlenie Olega (The Early Reign of Oleg), based on one of her three historical plays elaborating on events from the history of ancient Rus. The music for Oleg, furnished collaboratively by composers from Catherine’s court, features choruses, instrumental entr’actes, and a melodrama based on a scene from Euripides’s Alceste. Staged during the Second Russo-Turkish War (1787–91) at both the Hermitage court theater and the public Kamenny Theater, the play praised Catherine as a worthy successor to one of the greatest early sovereigns of Rus. Its performance involved 800 persons in total: a variety of native and foreign actors and musicians, the court chapel singers, and extras from three military regiments.

Read More
           
Comments | Posted in Featured Publications By A-R Editions

Getting to Know Barsanti Better

Wednesday, August 21, 2019 3:00:00 PM America/Chicago

By Michael Talbot

I first came across Francesco Barsanti (ca. 1690–1775) in the early 1960s, when I bought an LP of French horn concertos. I gave him little thought over the next five decades, when my research focused on Albinoni and Vivaldi. But my interest was rekindled when, following my retirement, I began to direct my attention also to music composed in eighteenth-century Britain by Italian immigrants. Barsanti, who lived for most of his working life in England and Scotland, was an ideal composer and musical personality to investigate; he not only integrated himself well into British musical life but also contributed something truly individual to it. His secular vocal music output encompasses four very different genres: the chamber cantata, the Italian madrigal, the French air, and the English catch.

Read More
           
Comments | Posted in Featured Publications By A-R Editions

Walter Porter: “An English Pupil of Monteverdi”

Wednesday, May 1, 2019 10:00:00 AM America/Chicago

By Jonathan Wainwright

Many years ago, as an undergraduate, I remember finding a couple of articles suggesting that Walter Porter was a pupil of the great Monteverdi, and thinking, “an English composer called Walter who studied with Monteverdi: a bit unlikely?!” As I continued my studies at the Ph.D. level and discovered more about the dissemination and influence of Italian music in England in the first half of the seventeenth century, I learned that Walter Porter didn’t need to go anywhere near Italy in order to study and get to know the most up-to-date Italian styles, and that all Monteverdi’s publications were easily available in London, but, I’m sad to say, my skepticism still shone through. Twenty years later, when editing Walter Porter’s collected works for A-R Editions, I had the opportunity to really get to know Porter’s music, and I’m now slightly embarrassed about my previous skepticism. I can now quite believe that Porter was a pupil of the great Monteverdi!

Read More
           
Comments | Posted in Featured Publications By A-R Editions
Items 1 to 5 of 20 total
Results per page:
Sort
© 2020 All Rights Reserved A-R Editions